Data is a Team Sport: Data-Driven Journalism

Our podcast series that explores the ever evolving data literacy eco-system. Cut and paste this link into your podcast app to subscribe: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:311573348/sounds.rss or find us in the iTunes Store and Stitcher.

In this episode we speak with two veteran data literacy practitioners who have been involved with developing data-driven journalism teams.

Our guests:

  • Eva Constantaras is a data journalist specialized in building data journalism teams in developing countries. These teams that have reported from across Latin America, Asia and East Africa on topics ranging from displacement and kidnapping by organized crime networks to extractive industries and public health. As a Google Data Journalism Scholar and a Fulbright Fellow, she developed a course for investigative and data journalism in high-risk environments.
  • Natalia Mazotte is Program Manager of School of Data in Brazil and founder and co-director of the digital magazine Gender and Number. She has a Master Degree in Communications and Culture from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a specialization in Digital Strategy from Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona/Spain). Natalia has been teaching data skills in different universities and newsrooms around Brazil. She also works as instructor in online courses in the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, a project from Texas University, and writes for international publications such as SGI News, Bertelsmann-Stiftung, Euroactiv and Nieman Lab.

Notes from this episode

They both describe the lessons learned in getting journalists to use data that can drive social change. For Eva, getting journalists to work harder and just reporting that corruption exists is not enough, while Natalia, talks about how they use data on gender to drive debate and discussion around equality. What is critical for democracy is the existence of good journalism and this includes data-driven journalism that uncovers facts and gets at the root causes.

Gaps in the Data Literacy EcoSystem:

Natalia points out that corporations and government has the power because they are data-literate and can use it effectively, while people in low-income communities, such as favela’s really suffer because they are at the mercy of what story gets told by looking at the ‘official’ data.

Eva feels that there has been too much emphasis on short-term and quick solutions from individuals who have put a lot of money in making sure that data is ready and accessible.  Donors need to support more long-term efforts and engagement around data-literacy.

Adjusting to a ‘post-fact’ world means:

Western journalists have spent too much time focusing on reporting on polling data rather than reporting on policies and it’s important for newer journalists to understand why that was problematic.

In Brazil, the main stream media is focusing on ‘what’s happened’ while independent media is focusing on ‘why it’s happened’ and this means the media landscape is changing.

They also talked about:

  • Ethics and the responsibility inherent in gathering and storing data, along with the grey areas around privacy.
  • How to get media outlets to value data-driven journalism by getting them to understand that people are increasingly getting their ‘breaking news’ from social media, so they need to look at providing more in-depth stories.

They wanted to plug:

Readings/Resources they find inspiring for their work.

Resources contributed from the participants:

View the online conversation in full:

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